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Japanese Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Pacific War

Others • 2012
AuthorsGiuseppe Picarella
IllustratorGiuseppe Picarella
ISBN978-83-61421-41-2
Release date2012-01-02
SeriesOthers
Cat. No.Oth.005
CategoryAvailable CategoryDostępne
FormatA4 HB, 248 pages (248 in colour)
Price139.00 PLN Price29.99 GBP
Information in English on Japanese WW2 transport aircraft is hard to find, and in this book the story of the Japanese experimental transport designs is told in great detail. The context is explained, with information on the low priority given to transport aircraft and the disastrous implications of that neglect for the Japanese war effort. Fully illustrated with many rare photos and excellent artwork, the various designs and proposals for transport aircraft during the war are described and discussed, both novel designs and adaptations of bomber aircraft.
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  • Air Modeller, Issue 41 • 2013-05-07
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  • Hyperscale.com • 2013-05-07

    Reviewed by Rodger Kelly

    F i r s t R e a d

    Recently released by MMP Books and printed in Poland by Stratus this new title provides coverage of the “less glamorous” World War Two era transport aircraft of both the Imperial Japanese Navy and Imperial Japanese Army. The title is a bit of a misnomer as whilst the experimental types are detailed you are also provided far more information on the operations of their military transport organisations, operations and operational aircraft.

    The book consists of 13 chapters in all preceded by a foreword, a Preface an introduction and followed by 5 appendices and a selected bibliography.

    The chapters are:

    Imperial Japanese Army Transport Aircraft - An Overview. 15 pages in all, the chapter details not only the aircraft used but also provides a complete synopsis of the organisation down to the air routes flown, the structure and even the tail markings for the individual squadrons.

    Imperial Japanese Navy Transport Aircraft - An Overview. 16 pages in all, the chapter provides the same comprehensive coverage of the transport arm of the Imperial Japanese Navy as does the previous chapter.

    Paratroop and Special Forces Operations. 21 pages. The chapter informs on the operations from 1942 through to 1945. Again, the information is very comprehensive.

    Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force 1941-1945. 26 pages. The “meat and potatoes” part of the book. Types detailed include the Tachikawa Ki-77, Ki-74, Ki-74, and Ki-92. The Mitsubishi Ki-97, Kokusai Ki-105 and Ki-111, as well as the Tachikawa Ki-110, Ki114, and Ki-120.

    Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Naval Air Force. 14 pages. Types covered include The Nippi L7P1flying boat, the huge Kawanishi HiiKi-L Soku, Kawanishi’s’ K-60, 120 and K-200. The Showa Kaso Type 0 L2D5 series, and the Dewotine/Mitsubishi D.350.

    Silent Wings of the Empire. A short 5 pages, the chapter also informs on the six types used operationally as well as the organisation down to the individual squadrons that made it up.

    Experimental Transport and Assault Gliders of Imperial Japan. 20 pages. Types covered include the Kokusai Ku-7-11. Nippon/Kokusai Ku-8-II – Army Type 4 Special Transport Glider, the Kokusai Ku-8-III, the Fukuda Ku-9, the Nippon Kogata Ku-11-I and Ku-11-II Transport Glider, and the Kugisho/Nihon Kogata MXY5. The chapter is rounded out by the inclusion of Technical Air Intelligence Center reports on the various types.

    Emissaries to the Emperor. This chapter in the main deals with the operation that saw the transporting of the Japanese surrender delegation in two Mitsubishi G6M1-L2 Betty aircraft from the mainland of Japan to Le Shima in the Ryukyu Islands in the August of 1945. The detail provided is quite comprehensive and includes the written orders to the Japanese as well as information on the markings worn by the two machines. Pictorial coverage is also provided of other “surrender” aircraft from other theatres.

    The Sun Goes Down. Coverage of the immediate post-surrender period. It includes some excellent images from the various areas of the Pacific and China as well as an Air Command South East Asia Weekly Intelligence Summary (Serial No 105 dated 21 November 1945) that details the aircraft found on Singapore Island.

    Post-war Japanese Transport Operations. Seven pages. This short chapter advises on the immediate post-war use of Japanese aircraft by the allied forces, in particular, the Royal Air Force’s Gremlin Task Force in French Indo-China.

    Allied Test Flights of Japanese Transport Aircraft. Six pages. In the main it informs on the testing of a Showa L2D3 Tabby and a Tachikawa Ki-54c Hickory as well as the transport of various types back to the United States for testing. The chapter includes an Air Ministry Weekly Information Service Intelligence Report from 2 June 1945 that details the differences between the Douglas C-47 and the Japanese Showa L2D3 Tabby.

    Surviving Transport Aircraft of Imperial Japan. 7 pages. Mainly photographic coverage of the Tachikawa Ki-45 Hickory in Australia and the Showa/Nakajima L2D2 Tabby on Yap Island.

    Japanese Transport Aircraft Photo Album. 19 pages. As the chapter title states, photographic coverage of various types both wartime and immediate post war.

    The five individual appendices detail:

    Appendix 1, 18 pages. Operational Japanese Transport Aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Army during WWII. A précis, images, and tabulated data of each type.

    Appendix 2, 26 pages. Operational Japanese Transport Aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Navy during WWII. A précis, images, and tabulated data of each type.

    Appendix 3, 2 pages. A service manual for the Showa L2D2.

    Appendix 4, 10 pages. Japanese registered “Civil” transport aircraft 1935-1945. Images of as well as a comprehensive database of aircraft by type and registration.

    Appendix 5, 6 pages. Japanese Aircraft Designations and Allied Code Names. An explanation of the Imperial Japanese Army system, Kitai numbering system, Type numbers, popular names, the Imperial Japanese Navy naming system, Shi numbers, short designations, type numbering system, the Service Aeroplane Development Programme system, and the Allied codename system.

    The book is lavishly illustrated throughout with excellent quality period images in both black and white and colour. Full colour line drawings, maps and unit insignia also feature.

    The book is hardback, A4 in size and comprise 248 Pages.

    Conclusion

    All up, a first rate publication that will give you a full and complete picture of the experimental transport types of the WWII Japanese military as well as the overall transport operation.

  • Model Aircraft volume 11 number 5 • 2013-05-07
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  • IPMS UK Magazine 02/2012 • 2013-05-07
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  • Model Airplane International 05/2012 • 2013-05-07
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  • AIR Modeller 41 • 2013-05-07
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  • Amazon.com customer review (3) • 2013-05-07

    Excellent over-view ... May 30, 2012

    By N. Page

    ...devoted to types I didn't realise I was interested in until I picked up this book. Fascinating and absorbing new 250-page A-4 hardback book from Stratus/MMP compiled by Giuseppe 'Joe' Picarella, a technical artist on the staff of Flight International and consultant to the RAF Museum (Hendon). This is a fine survey of a little known area of aviation knowledge - Japanese transports and operations during the Pacific War.

    My interest in Japanese aircraft of the Pacific War was fueled back in the early 1970's by a library copy of René J. Francillon's ground-breaking Putnam "Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War". But as Francillon himself admits in the Foreword to Picarella's book, his reputation has long since been usurped in this field by the work of researchers like Picarella himself. Indeed this new work contains information and photos of types that Francillon had no idea even existed, such as the Tachikawa 92, a developmental transport type aimed more or less squarely at the post-war civil market of which one prototype was constructed.

    The book is divided into a number of chapters such as Army and Navy transport aircraft, paratroops and special forces and assault and transport gliders. Chapter 4, of 25 pages, covers Army transports and includes details of types such as the Tachikawa Ki-77 & Ki-74, a lovely section on the Ki-92 as well as the Mitsubishi Ki-97, Kokusai Ki-105 "Otori", Tachikawa Ki-110, Kokusai Ki-111, Tachikawa Ki-114 and Ki-120. Chapter 5 deals with the navy experimental transports, specifically the Nippi L7P1, Kawanishi H11K1-L "Soku", Kawanishi K-60, K-120, K-200 and Showa L2D5.

    These two chapters are the heart of the work and the sections I found most fascinating. They include the best ever coverage of and photographic material devoted to the Tachikawa Ki-92 and this type has pride of place on the book jacket/cover. The research on and the hunt for photographs of the Tachikawa 92 is ably recounted and a fascinating part of the story

  • Amazon.com customer review (4) • 2013-05-07

    Just what I wanted and more. June 8, 2012

    By German

    Giuseppe Picarella has written an excellent book on a neglected part of the Imperial Japanese War Machine, Transport aircraft. A neglect that contributed to Japan losing the war. The text and drawings are superb in providing information to the reader. This book is a must have for Pacific War Buffs.

  • Amazon.co.uk customer review (2) • 2013-05-07

    Who knew Transport Aircraft could be so interesting???

    22 Sep 2012 By David A. Eitel

    Honestly, I bought this book just to fill out my Japanese Aircraft book collection, but once I started reading a few sections, I was hooked. I really didn't think it would be very interesting, but some of the developmental twists and turns the Japanese took, and the outstanding illustrations & pictures provided that help "tell the story"... I read every single page. Very good work, would definitely recommend to the Japanese aircraft enthusist. - D.Eitel

  • Cybermodeler.com • 2013-05-07

    By Ray Mehlberger

    Review

    [...]

    The book is hard-bound and 248 pages long in 8 ½” x 11” format. The cover art shows a Japanese flag with a color photo of a Tachikawa Ki-92 below it. The author’s photo appears in color on the back cover of the book. He is posed on the wing of a plane in a museum. Next to his photo is a biography about him. It says:

    “A full time member of Flight International – the oldest weekly aviation magazine in the world – Giuseppe “Joe” Picarella, in his role as Senior Technical Artist, is responsible for the world-renowned cutaway illustrations that appear in the magazine.

    While his day-to-day job brings him into contact with the most modern and diverse aerospace projects, he has devoted more than 25 years of his free time to restoring and researching many of the surviving Japanese aircraft held in museums and private collections around the world.

    As the Japanese aviation consultant to the Royal Air Force Museum (Hendon) he has been involved with and surveyed all of the Japanese aircraft within the collection, together with all the surviving Japanese aircraft in the UK. Internationally, he consults for several private and national collections and is currently involved with numerous static and flying Japanese aircraft restoration projects.

    A member of the Royal Aeronautical Society and pilot, he and his wife own and operate an original 1942 Piper L-4B “Grasshopper” liaison aircraft in the south of England”

    There is very little information in English on Japanese transport aircraft of WWII. This new book from the well-known illustrator and author Giuseppe Picarella covers all the experimental transport aircraft of the period (including gliders), and puts them into context with the overall story of Japanese military transport operations of the period.

    Both the Navy and the Air Force in Japan neglected transport aviation, with disastrous consequences for logistics in the extended theatres of the war. The most important aircraft built and used in Japan were copies of the DC-3 and various Lockheed types! Japanese designs were mostly converted bombers – but there were some interesting projects and prototypes, all described in detail here.

    The book is profusely illustrated with 309 wartime black and white photos and 17 color ones. Many of these photos are rare. Added to these are the author’s own superb illustrations.

    The table of contents Lists:

    Forward

    Preface

    Introduction I

    mperial Japanese Army Transport Aircraft – an Overview

    Imperial Japanese Navy Transport aircraft – an Overview

    Paratroop and Special Forces Operations

    Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Imperial

    Japanese Army Air force 1941-1945

    Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Imperial

    Japanese Naval Force

    Silent Wings of the Empire Experimental Transport and Assault Gliders of Imperial Japan

    Emissaries to the Emperor

    The Sun Goes Down

    Post-war Japanese Transport Operations

    Allied Test Flights of Japanese Transport Aircraft

    Surviving Transport Aircraft of Imperial Japan

    Japanese Transport Aircraft Photo Album

    Appendix 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 Selected Bibliography

    There are 39 full color illustrations of tail codes.

    Color profiles include:

    Nakajima G5N2-L

    Mitsubishi G6M1-L2

    Mitsubishi Ki-57-II “Topsy”

    Mitsubishi Ki-21-IIb “Sally”

    Interior of Tachikawa Ki-92 and 2 side profiles of it

    2 profiles of Kokusai Ki-105 “Ohtori”

    Cut-away of H11K1-L

    A 3-view of Showa L2D5 and a second side profile of it Kokusai Ku-7-II

    A 2-view of Kokusai Ki-8-II as cut-aways & a single side profile Mitsubishi Ki-57-II “Topsy”

    Black and white line drawings include:

    A cut-away of a Tachikawa Ki-77 and a 3-view of it.

    A 3-view of Tachikawa Ki-74 and a cut-away of it.

    A 6-view of a Tachikawa Ki-92

    A 5-view of variants of the Mitsubishi Ki-97, plus another 4-view of it.

    A 5-view of the Kokusai Ki=105 “Ohtori”

    Single drawing of Yokosuka/Nihon Kogata MXY5 – Navy

    Single drawing of Nihon Kogata Kv-11 – Army

    Single drawing of Nihon Kokusai Ku-8-11 – Army 4-view of Kokusi KV-7 “Manazuni”

    4-view of Nihon KoKusai Ki-8-11

    Single drawing of Fukuda Ku-9

    3-view of Nihon Kogata Ku-11

    4-view of Yokosuka/Nihon MXY-5

    Single drawing of Mitsubishi GM1-L2 “Bataan”

    3-view of Nakajima Ki-34

    3-view of Tachikawa Ki-54c

    3-view of Kawasaki Ki-56

    3-view of Mitsubishi Ki-57-1

    3-view of Kokusai Ki-59

    3-view of Tachikawa SS-1

    3-view of Kawanishi H6K4-L

    4 profiles showing development of the Showa L2D 3-view of Mitsubishi K3M3

    3-view cut away of Kawanishi H8K2-L

    3-view cut away of Mitsubishi G8M1-L2 Cut away of Nakajima G5N2-L

    3-view of Kyushu K11W1 5-view of Fukuda/Hitachi

    Ht-3 research glider

    There are 55 data charts in the book and illustrations of 4 enemy ID posters identifying the Japanese aircrafts:

    “Tess”, “Thelma”, “Thalia” and “MC-20”

    I recommend this book as an essential guide to Japanese Transport Aircraft design and operational use before and during the war. It will be great reading for all aviation enthusiasts, historians and modelers with an interest in Japanese aircraft of the period.

  • ModelingMadness.com • 2013-05-07

    Reviewer: Scott Van Aken

    A lesson that was learned the hard way in WWII is that while it is nice to have a large bomber and fighter force, you also need to have a good sized air transport arm. These aircraft are used to move men and materiel to the front and to do so in a timely manner. Of all the belligerents, Germany probably had the best force of Ju-52s and even that was not enough. The United States and Great Britain had little ready to go and relied on impounded airliners until things got going. Eventually, it was the C-46 and C-47 that was able to meet many of the demands of Allied air transport.

    Despite getting into the war a few years after the others, the Japanese had almost nothing in the way of air transport. What little they did have were Fokker Universal airliners as well as some rather small, C-45 sized transports used to haul VIPs, and an adaptation of the Ki-21, the MC-21. Ironically, the best transport in Japanese service during the start of the war, though in tiny numbers, was a license built DC-3. This aircraft continued to be built during the war but was still not built in sufficient numbers.

    This book by Giusepe Picarella takes a good look at the condition of Japanese Army and Navy military air transportation during the Pacific War. It is an area that has gotten very little press and even less research as most enthusiasts are more interested in fighters and bombers than transports. Though titled 'experimental transports', the book also covers to a lesser degree, those that were in service.

    Logically, there are sections that deal with Army and Navy transports separately, as there was little sharing of aircraft types between the two services. We begin with an overview of Army and then Navy transports, how the units were arranged and employed before going into a section on the use of these planes in paratroop and special operations. It would probably not be surprising for you to learn that many 'transport' aircraft were simply converted obsolescent bombers.

    We then get into the experimental types. These are aircraft that were either under serious consideration for construction, or those that were built and tested. The cover aircraft is a prime example of the latter. Then there is a section on gliders as used by the Japanese as well as separate sections covering Navy and Army types. Like the Germans, the Japanese did power some of its gliders with low rated engines in an effort to increase transport capabilities.

    A large section is dedicated to the use of transports for the various surrender delegations as well as Japanese transport operations immediately post war. Just because the Allies were victorious, does not mean that Japanese troops were stranded, but these men had to be brought home and liaison still needed to be conducted from the various areas of the old Empire. This was done using Japanese planes and crews, assisted by Allied ground crews.

    There are sections on test flying some of these aircraft as well as surviving airframes and a large photo section containing a potpourri of types. The book ends with the usual appendices containing tables of stats on the various types.

    The total result is the best look at transport types of all types as used by the Japanese during WWII. A book that has to be the best yet done in the West and perhaps the best done anywhere. I found it to be a truly fascinating read and a great look into this little covered aspect of military aviation. A book that is a must have for Japanese aircraft fans and one that I can most highly recommend for great information and superb photographs (several of them in full color).

    January 2012

  • J-aircraft.com • 2013-05-07

    Here at last and now available is a real Tour de Force providing a much needed comprehensive study of Japanese transport aircraft, and in the English language!

    The word “Experimental” in the book title is not as limiting as it might sound. The weird and wonderful are certainly there including land planes, flying-boats and gliders no less, from those projected to those that actually reached the prototype stage, but described within the context of all the many operational transport aircraft used by the IJAAF and IJNAF, including those impressed into military service from the principal civil airlines between 1935 and 1945.

    An Introductory section first addresses Japan’s perceived military and civil air transport requirements from the early 1930s onwards and illustrates how they were assessed inadequately from the start, especially for military use. It goes on to describe how imported aircraft initially formed the backbone of all air transport services in Japan until indigenous designs and derivatives began slowly supplementing and superseding them from around 1937. Thereafter it analyses how and why transport aircraft were always in short supply until the end of the Pacific War, well supported by production statistics for the many types of aircraft involved.

    The first two chapters supplement the introduction by giving separate broad overviews of IJAAF and IJNAF Transport Aircraft. The overviews cover the main routes used, how the various types of transports were used on them, the involvement of civil airlines, and the distribution of both dedicated and affiliated transport units with colour representations of the emblems/tail codes they used. The third chapter offers something for combat lovers and is entitled “Paratroop and Special Forces Operations”. In essence it covers in some detail all the comparatively few Japanese aerial assault operations carried out during the Pacific War featuring the units, their transport aircraft and the actions themselves.

    Now comes the heart of the book (literally) with three fascinating chapters on IJAAF and IJNAF Experimental Transport Aircraft, and Experimental Transport/Assault Gliders. The latter chapter is preceded by another entitled “Silent Wings of the Empire” that forms a background to it with details of such gliders that actually saw operational service. The comprehensive information presented in these chapters consists of three view drawings, interior layout drawings mostly in part colour, specification and performance tables, and photographs, all accompanied by extensive text on the reasons for the development, the development history itself, and the fate of each of the some 20 types of aircraft described.

    After that feast there are five more intriguing chapters: “Emissaries to the Emperor”, featuring the transport aircraft used to bring Japanese delegations to surrender points; “The Sun Goes Down”, listing surrendered Japanese aircraft at various airfields; “Post-war Japanese Transport Operations” describing the Gremlin Task Force and Green Cross flights that used Japanese transports and crews for repatriation and delivering relief supplies in the absence of any organised post-war country infrastructure; “Surviving Transport Aircraft of Imperial Japan” and “Japanese Transport Aircraft Transport Photo Album” that are self-explanatory.

    Finally there are four appendices, one each giving details of IJAAF, IJNAF and Civil Registered operational transport aircraft and one consisting of the TAIU Service Manual for the Showa L2D.

    There is icing on top of this rich cake as well! Approximately 300 good quality photos including some 20 in colour and many that have rarely been seen before; 14 colour side profiles, 30 three-view drawings, 10 sketches and three maps; last, but by no means least, excerpts from relevant Allied Intelligence and Technical Reports are given in several chapters.

    The author has made this whole work extremely interesting and very readable, complimented by a well laid-out presentation. It is a mine of collated information hitherto found only fragmented and incomplete on a subject too long overshadowed by more glamorous combat aircraft. It is highly recommended and a real “must buy” for all Japanese aviation enthusiasts, whether historians or modellers.

    Thanks to MMP for the review copy.

    Peter Starkings

  • Scaleplasticandrail.com • 2013-05-07

    As regular readers will know, I have a more-than-passing interest in the Pacific War, particularly the naval vessels and aircraft used by the Japanese in that conflict. When I learned, however, that Mushroom was to publish a book on Japanese transport aircraft used and under development for the theatre, I had to sit back and think. I very quickly realised that, despite my long standing interest, I knew almost nothing about the aircraft the Japanese actually used as transports, nor how they were used. Only one incident will loom large in most modeller's minds – the converted G4M "Betty" bomber that was used as a personal transport by the Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet, Admiral Yamamoto, an aircraft in which he was shot down and killed in April 1943. But, beyond that, very little...

    So, Giuseppe Picarella, a well-known aviation writer and Japanese aviation consultant to the RAF Museum (Hendon), has collected together a wealth of detail, historical events, developmental processes and rare photographs to publish what is, to my knowledge, the first authoritative book on the subject.

    The book basically falls into five sections: after the introduction, there is an initial overview split into Army and Navy transport aircraft along with a fascinating section on paratroop and special forces operations; next there are major sections on experimental army and navy transport aircraft; Japanese assault and transport gliders, both those in service and experimental types are the next topic addressed, again an area I previously knew nothing about; the transport of the Japanese surrender delegation in 1945 has its own section; and the book then concludes with a group of shorter chapters on post-war aircraft in allied hands, including test flights, surviving aircraft and a photo album section. A pair of appendices looks at each operational type of the army and navy in more detail.

    The depth and thoroughness of the research is of the highest calibre and I found Picarella's style easy to read and get involved with. As mentioned, I found the chapters on paratroop operations and gliders of the greatest interest, mainly because of my lack of knowledge. It is was also interesting to note that, just as modellers and historians we have neglected the transport aircraft area, so did Japan itself and the author draws the effects this had on the nation's wartime efforts and operations really well.

    As usual, I will now give a series of photographs of some of the content so that the reader can gain a flavour for this excellent volume. Firstly, there is a spread from the paratroop and special forces section, with mock-ups of B-29 Superfortresses along with a profile of a Mitsubishi Ki-21 'Sally' aircraft; (below)

    [...]

    Plans and a photo of the Kokusai Ki-105 'Buzzard', an aircraft in development that could have been the inspiration for the successful post-war Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar transport aircraft (above); a selection of photos of the specially marked white Mitsubishi G4M 'Betty' bombers used in the transport of the surrender delegation (below);

    [...]

    post-war aircraft in use, including a Ki-54c 'Hickory' and L2D3 'Tabby' transports, the latter being based on the American DC-3 (above); and, finally, some excellent colour shots of a burnt-out 'Tabby' taken recently at Yap Airport in the West Caroline Islands (below);

    [...]

    I have no doubt as to the quality of this book – it literally leaps off the pages at you. My only comment would be that, because of the subject matter, it may not have as wide an audience as some of the other excellent MMP books published recently. That being said, I found it an excellent read and a good reference for many aircraft types. It is a little more expensive as well, but totally in line price-wise with other 250 page hardback references.

    So What Do We Think?

    An eye-opening read on a much neglected subject. If you have any interest at all in Japanese aviation, this should be high on your shopping list.

    Highly recommended

    Our thanks to MMP Books for the review copy. To purchase directly, click THIS link.

    Robin Jenkins.

  • Amazon.jp customer review (1) • 2013-05-07

    1 人中、1人の方が、「このレビューが参考になった」と投票しています。

    5つ星のうち 4.0 タイトルに反して、日本陸海軍の輸送機を包括する内容です

    2012/4/15 By MK

    タイトルは「試作機」をうたっていますが、実際に試作機輸送機に言及しているのは、陸海軍それぞれ一章ずつであり、この点はやや看板に偽りありといった感があります。もっとも、それゆえに、本書は日本語文献でも珍しい、日本陸海軍の輸送機を横断的に紹介した内容となっており、航空関係の書籍に簡単な説明はあるものの、具体的な写真や図版での紹介の少ない、一式輸送機などの写真や座席レイアウト、緑十字機なども多くの写真や図版で紹介されており、こうした機体に興味のある人にとっては魅力的な内容でしょう。

    また英語圏の研究者の書籍らしく、連合国側から日本軍輸送機の評価などにも一章がさかれているのも面白いところです。

    実質的に2章しかない試作輸送機の項ですが、四式重爆の主翼設計を流用した陸軍のキ-92の複数の鮮明な写真(レビューアーは不勉強なため、本書ではじめて知りました)や、海軍の零式輸送機の木製型についての比較的詳しい言及(写真も、R・ミケシュ氏の本に掲載されたもの以外の数点が掲載されています)があるなど、表題に即した内容も相応に新規性のあるものとはなっています。

    マイナーな機体が多い本ですが、このテーマで一冊の本が編まれることは珍しいこと、価格の洋書としては比較的安価なことから、本レビューでは☆4つとしています。☆一つの減点は内容的にやや散漫なことと、タイトルと内容の差によるものですが、様々な意味でオンリーワンな点を評価すれば、☆5つとする人も少なくないかもしれません。

  • Amazon.jp customer review (2) • 2013-05-07

    大日本絵画さん翻訳版をお願いします。 2012/6/21

    By HB VINE™ メンバー

     本書の内容は他のレビュアーの方の通りですが、その構成は

    ・序文(第二次大戦の日本陸海軍における輸送機の位置づけ)

    ・陸軍と海軍での輸送機の開発運用状況及び輸送機による空挺作戦

    ・第二次大戦中の陸海軍の試作輸送機及び輸送グライダー

    ・終戦連絡に従事した緑十字輸送機や戦後の状況

    ・現存する機体(北京航空博物館に残る胴体のみの立川キ-54で状態も良くありません)

    ・写真集(勿論、本文にも写真は添付されています)

    ・付録として制式採用された輸送機名鑑(1式陸上輸送機の図は機体がG4M2というミスもありますが・・・)

     本書の著者は川崎キ100五式戦闘機 (エアロ・ディテール)の著者ですし、この出版社の本が何冊か大日本絵画社から出版されている縁もあり、多くの人に読んで頂きたくタイトルの様な読後感になった次第です。

  • InterenetModeler.com • 2013-05-07

    By Chris Banyai-Riepl

    While much attention is given to the fighters and bombers of the military, an important aspect of aviation is the role of transport. With its ability to move people and material much quicker than by land or sea, the airplane as transport is an essential part of any military. With the war in the East, the Japanese discovered the value of transport aviation, as they had vast ranges to cover in both China and the Pacific. This interesting title from Stratus delves into the subject of Japanese transport aviation, both operational and experimental.

    While the subject of transport aviation is not a common subject of books, that of Japanese transport aviation is even more so. Both the lack of research and the language differences meant that information on these aircraft in the Western world was extremely limited. The author recognized that and turned his initial interest in a single aircraft (the Ki-92) into what is easily the most comprehensive treatise on Japanese transport aviation currently in print in English. The book examines both Imperial Japanese Army and Imperial Japanese Navy operational transport aircraft before delving into the experimental side of things. For the experimental aircraft, there are photos and drawings of each type, or at least where photos could be found. There are also several color profile illustrations that help give shape to these designs.

    This is very much a labor of love for the author, and the level of research shows that affection. It truly takes someone close to a subject to be this detailed about such an obscure subject, and his work in this book fills a gap in Japanese aviation of the Second World War. My thanks to Mushroom Model Publications and Stratus for the review copy.

  • The Aerospace Professional February 2013 • 2013-05-07
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  • Aerostories.org • 2013-05-07

    Rarely selected by the publishers, transport aircraft of World War II are also generally not seen as a main topic for the readers despite their major role in this conflict and they prefer to read books on fighters or bombers aircraft. Therefore, when the need of references on Japanese transport aircraft arises, choices became clearly very limited but with this book published by Mushroom, the least we can say is that a great step forward has been done. Indeed, this book is without a doubt a very good reference for anyone who is looking for information about Japanese transport aircraft of WW2. It wasn’t an easy task knowing that Japan has neglected its part of aviation during the war, leaving little documentation to exploit. Nevertheless, the author was able to offer us all what we need to know with clarity and simplicity on these aircraft and the final result is excellent with a rich illustration with photos throughout the book.

    Even if this topic can’t pretend to be as passionate as a book on Japanese fighters for instance, in giving a precise inventory of aircraft used by the Japanese Army and Navy, this book is unquestionably one if not the best reference of Japanese transport aircraft for the time being.

    Highly recommended

    Phil Listemann

  • www.modelersalliance.com • 2013-05-07

    When I received this book from Stratus Publications, it was a surprise. The title, "Japanese Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Pacific War" is unique and a welcome addition to any person's library. Yet, what was fascinating is the breadth of the subject matter. As far as I knew, most of the photos would have been of the Tabby and converted bombers. I am happy to have been proven wrong.

    Guiseppe Picarelli is a new name to me as an author but the fact that Stratus published his work speaks volumes about the quality. This is a hefty hardcover with 248 pages, many photographs, color artwork, scale plans, cutaway illustrations (of which Guiseppe is renowned for in Flight International), five appendices, and a bibliography.

    Taking the time to read the text, it becomes obvious that the author is fascinated by the subject and has devoted a lot of time to research and illustrations. Aside from a Foreword, Preface, and Introduction, there are thirteen chapters.

    1. Imperial Japanese Army Transport Aircraft - An Overview

    2. Imperial Japanese Navy Transport Aircraft - An Overview

    3. Paratroop and Special Forces Operations

    4. Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force 1941-1945

    5. Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Naval Air Force

    6. Silent Wings of the Empire

    7. Experimental Transport and Assault Gliders of Imperial Japan

    8. Emissaries to the Emperor

    9. The Sun Goes Down

    10. Post-War Japanese Transport Operations

    11. Allied Test Flights of Japanese Transport Aircraft

    12. Surviving Transport Aircraft of Imperial Japan

    13. Japanese Transport Aircraft Photo Album

    As can be seen, the chapters are well thought out, very thorough, entertaining, and informative.

    The printing is excellent even if it took me a while to get accustomed to the graphics design. Slick matte paper is used which allows for excellent photo reproduction and the binding is quite good. However, I had to get accustomed to the gradient colors used in the background with matching hues used for the photographs. Looking for the page numbers? They are mostly hidden as they appear in the top inboard section of the A4 pages.

    Returning to the photographs, many wrecks are shown due to the rarity of the subject and the captions are clear, concise, and informative. Tables appear throughout helping one understand aircraft technical data and so on. The tail markings illustrations, in color, are an excellent reference point for the modeler as are the photographs from the Allied test flights.

    This is an excellent book by all accounts. It is surprising in the amount of information contained within and a reference to many modelers who may want to tackle a unique subject. My thanks to MMP and Stratus Publications for the review book.

  • Kitmaniac.com • 2013-05-07

    The aviation history researchers have worked on a great number of themes, but the Japanese aviation history is relegating to a second plane principally in occident. This kind we modelers find few options of publications with a deep research about the Japanese aviation.

    The new title from MMP Books give us a great increase of information, images and designs about some of most unstudied themes about the Japanese aviation history, your transport aircraft, projects and test planes.

    Giuseppe Picarella, the Author, do a great work on this book, that he make question to dedicate to your collaborators. This is a great book to lovers of Japanese and WWII aviation theme, the text is very concise and easy to understand.

    The Book:

    With an A4 format, the book presents a hard cover with a nice composition of a Japanese transport plane and the Japanese WWII flag, 248 pages with a great number of Images, some of her in color, technical drawings, color profiles and tail code designs. The book is divided in 13 chapters:

    1. Imperial Japanese Army Transport Aircraft – An Overview, 2. Imperial Japanese Navy Transport Aircraft – An Overview, 3. Paratroop and Special Forces Operations, 4. Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force 1941-1945, 5. Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Naval Air Force, 6. Silent Wings of the Empire, 7. Experimental Transport and Assault Gliders of Imperial Japan, 8. Emissaries to the Emperor, 9. The Sun Goes Down, 10. Post-War Japanese Transport Operations, 11. Allied Test Flights of Japanese Transport Aircraft, 12. Surviving Transport Aircraft of Imperial Japan, 13. Japanese Transport Aircraft Photo Album

    The great quality of black white and colored images became clear the great work of research from Giuseppe Picarella. We find amazing air to air, Wrecks and test images. This is a richest collection of the Japanese transport aircraft images on WWII.

    Conclusion:

    The book is a great release just by the fact that we have a little quantity of publications about the Japanese aviation history dedicated to a deep research work. But when we open the book we find a great work on the information and images that became this book something necessary both for modelers and aviation history researchers. Reading this pages I understand many thinks about the problems that contributed to Japanese’s lost the war. This title is Highly recommended and is indispensable for the aviation lovers. [...]

    Best,

    Pompeo

  • Arawasi blog • 2013-05-07

    Received last weekend a copy of this new publication and I like it!

    I was originally taken aback by the title...I mean, how many "experimental" Japanese transports were out there and what kind of book would someone write about them but once I started going through the pages I got to like the book a lot. So, basically, forget the title. This book is the best effort so far on the much overlooked subject of J. Navy and Army transports in any language. The first two chapters offer excellent overviews of the organisation of the transport units of IJAAF and IJNAFwith plenty of details on the Navy transport kokutais. The third part of 20 pages, is specifically about the operations of paratroops and special forces.

    Chapter 4, of 25 pages, is about the experimental transports of the Army. It covers types like Tachikawa Ki-77 & Ki-74, the best ever coverage and photographic material on the Tachikawa Ki-92 as well as the Mitsubishi Ki-97, Kokusai Ki-105 "Otori", Tachikawa Ki-110, Kokusai Ki-111, Tachikawa Ki-114 and Ki-120.

    Chapter 5 deals with the navy experimental transports, specifically the Nippi L7P1, Kawanishi H11K1-L "Soku", Kawanishi K-60, K-120, K-200 and Showa L2D5. Finally a rather "what-if" Dewoitine/Mitsubishi D.350.

    Chapter 6 & 7 deal with the IJAAF & IJNAF experimental gliders and their units with good photographic coverage and plenty of information.

    Chapter 8 is a photo coverage of the transport planes that carried the surrender delegation while chapter 9 features a very interesting photo collection of captured transports at the end of the war.

    Chapter 10 is entitled "Post-war Japanese Transport Operations" and examines how the Allies used a number of Japanese transports immediately after the end of the war and in chapter 11 how they evaluated them. The short but with excellent photos, 13 of them in color, chapter 12 is about the "Surviving Transport Aircraft of Imperial Japan".

    Final chapter 13 is a photo album of J. transports with 42 photos of exceptional quality.

    Appendixes 1 & 2 cover in short most if not all the J. Navy and Army transports of WII. Appendix 3 includes a document entitled "Service manual for L2D2" while appendix 4 presents a list with the civilian registrations of transports while appendix 5 explains the Japanese Aircraft Designations and Allied Code Names.

    Info: A-4 size, hb, 248 pages, 312 photos (17 in color), 62 drawing and illustration sets most in color. Mushroom Model Publications, ISBN 978-83-61421-41-2, Contact: http://www.mmpbooks.biz/

    Overall: Don't hesitate to buy this book due to the title. It's a highly recommended publication, of interest to J. aviation fans as well as modellers who will find in it a treasure trove of information and modelling ideas. Some of the photos can be found in past publications but in this book they are bigger and of better quality. There is a good number of brilliant new photos, especially the Ki-92 set, and "Joe" Picarella has made the book really beautiful with his detailed illustrations.

    (Special thank yous to the author and publisher for the copy.

    No thanks to the other publisher who haven't sent me copies of the books I contributed material in.) Posted by Arawasi

  • Amazon.com customer review (1) • 2013-05-07

    By Mike G

    I didn't realise there was much to say about Japanese Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Pacific War before reading this book, but it fills thirteen chapters and five appendices. The core of the book is two chapters on Japanese Army and Navy Air Force experimental transports, set into context with well-laid out and illustrated information on the history of air transport in imperial Japan, and with sections on paratroop and special forces operations, transport glider aircraft and - especially - coverage of the fate of the Japanese air transport industry at and after the end of the Pacific War.

    The book is excellently laid out, with illustrations on every page. The reproduction of the better-known photographs is the best I have seen in book form, and nearly half of them are new to me, from the author's own collection. A few (post-war) photographs are in colour, and the author's renown as a technical aviation illustrator is apparent in the explanatory drawings that feature throughout.

  • Amazon.co.uk customer review (1) • 2013-05-07

    By N. Page (UK)

    on types I didn't realise I was interested in until I picked up this book. Fascinating and absorbing new 250-page A-4 hardback book from Stratus/MMP compiled by Giuseppe 'Joe' Picarella, a technical artist on the staff of Flight International and consultant to the RAF Museum (Hendon). This is a fine survey of a little known area of aviation knowledge - Japanese transports and operations during the Pacific War.

    My interest in Japanese aircraft of the Pacific War was fueled back in the early 1970's by a library copy of René J. Francillon's ground-breaking Putnam "Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War". But as Francillon himself admits in the Foreword to Giuseppe Picarella's new work on Japanese Transports published by Stratus, his reputation has long since been usurped in this field by the work of researchers like Picarella. Indeed Picarella' new work contains information and photos of types that Francillon had no idea even existed, such as the Tachikawa 92, a developmental transport type aimed more or less squarely at the post-war civil market of which one prototype was constructed.

    The book is divided into a number of chapters such as Army and Navy transport aircraft, paratroops and special forces and assault and transport gliders. Chapter 4, of 25 pages, covers Army transports and includes details of types such as the Tachikawa Ki-77 & Ki-74, a lovely section on the Ki-92 as well as the Mitsubishi Ki-97, Kokusai Ki-105 "Otori", Tachikawa Ki-110, Kokusai Ki-111, Tachikawa Ki-114 and Ki-120. Chapter 5 deals with the navy experimental transports, specifically the Nippi L7P1, Kawanishi H11K1-L "Soku", Kawanishi K-60, K-120, K-200 and Showa L2D5.

    These two chapters are the heart of the work and the sections I found most fascinating. They include the best ever coverage of and photographic material devoted to the Tachikawa Ki-92 and this type has pride of place on the book jacket/cover. The research on and the hunt for photographs of the Tachikawa 92 is ably recounted.

    My copy was a slightly damaged example from the amazon warehouse and was well worth the £13 I spent on it - normal RRP is around £27 which is reasonable VFM, although amazon.co.uk have it on sale at £19 and you really shouldn't miss this excellent book with this amazon discount...

  • Scalemodellingnow.com • 2013-05-07

    Review by: Geoff Coughlin

    There is very little information in English on Japanese transport aircraft of WW2. This new book from well-known illustrator and author Giuseppe Picarella covers all the experimental transport aircraft of the period (including gliders) and puts them into context, with the overall story of Japanese military transport aircraft operations of the period.

    Both the navy and airforce in Japan neglected transport aviation, with disastrous consequences for the logistics in the extended theatres of war. The most important transport aircraft built and used in Japan were copies of the DC-3 and the various Lockheed types.

    Japanese designs were mostly converted bombers – but there were some interesting projects and prototypes, all described in detail here.

    In addition to many contemporary images, there are colour profiles of representative aircraft from both sides, and many line drawings of the types featured.

    The author is well respected and the coverage is extensive and well-researched.

    It’s hard to imagine that this volume originated from the emergence of a single photo of the Tachikawa Ki-92 in the late 1990s and, as it became apparent that little was currently available of Japanese transport aircraft, the author’s journey began and culminated in this excellent title.

    It’s an extraordinary feat of work and I congratulate him on such a fine publication.

    Useful for scale modellers…

    This title is a great mix of text and quality images; it may not, at first glance, seem to offer as much to scale modellers as other publications concerned with more common aircraft types, but this would be to misjudge the content.

    The depth and coverage, together with the excellent colour profiles and all-aspect line drawings, will provide plenty of scope for influencing your choice of model.

    The period images will certainly give you much to contemplate in terms of finish and weathering, but you should take a long look at the words. The writing gives great insight into all aspects of Japanese military transport aviation in WW2 and you certainly get a strong feel for the subject working through the impressive 248 pages.

    Recommended.

    Geoff C.

  • Amazon.com customer review (2) • 2013-05-07

    Outstanding reference marred by some clumsy editing, March 7, 2012

    By Jim Davis

    This is truly a groundbreaking work. There is a lot of new information (at least in English) supported by well reproduced photographs, new artwork, and contemporary Allied intelligence reports and recognition flyers. The whole book gives every impression of being very well researched. This is the first book I've read by Giuseppe Picarella and I was very impressed; let's hope for many more.

    The author was not served particularly well by his publishers, though. The book is loaded with annoying errors of the wrong verb tense or the noun form of a word used instead of the verb form. "Equipment with" instead of "equipped with" is but one example. I can only conclude the fault lies with Polish typesetters unfamiliar with English usage.

    The layout of the book is also a little puzzling. In the main part of the book transport operations are meticulously detailed but the details of the aircraft conducting them are given in appendices. Surely it would have made more sense to include these in the main narrative and title the book simply "Japanese Transport Aircraft of the Pacific War"? I suspect this was the original intention but sales prospects were considered to be greater with the word "experimental" in the title.

    I understand the rationale behind the colorized cover photograph but at the very least it should have been identified as such.

    But none of this should discourage anyone with interest in the subject from buying the book. It is a fascinating look at an obscure subject. Highly recommended.

  • IPMSUSA.org • 2013-05-07

    Reviewed by: Paul Mahoney, IPMS #8943

    The very first thing I would like to say about this excellent book is that the title does it a disservice. This book does a great job covering ALL transport aircraft of the Japanese Army and Navy Air Forces during the Pacific War. In fact, out of the thirteen chapters in the book, only three are devoted exclusively to experimental aircraft.

    This book is hardbound and comprised just under 250 pages. Production quality is quite high, and there are photos and nicely-done color plates throughout the book. In terms of content, the first few chapters describe the history of transport aircraft in both branches of Japanese service, beginning in the 1920s. An entire chapter is dedicated to Paratroop and Special Forces operations. Following this are chapters on experimental transports, followed by sections covering both operational and experimental transport and assault gliders. Next comes a chapter devoted to the transport aircraft involved in ferrying the surrender delegations to the Allied forces. Rounding this all out is a chapter on surviving transport aircraft and finally a “photo album” with various snapshots.

    The author does a nice job describing the early history of military transport aircraft in Japan during the 1920s and 1930s. There seemed to be little pressing need for any type of dedicated transport aircraft or units, and any demand for such was thought to be able to be provided by the various “independent” airlines operated by Japan in the region. By the time the Pacific War was underway and the demand for aircraft to transport men and material over the vast distances was realized, it was essentially too late. As a result, very few indigenous exclusively-transport designs made it into full production. By far, the most-produced transport aircraft in Japan during this period was the L2D (code-named “Tabby”), which originated as a license-built version of the Douglas DC-3.

    A very clear picture is painted of the indecision, and reversal of decisions, surrounding various transport designs. First it was thought that none were needed, then the airlines were thought to be sufficient providers, then it became apparent dedicated transport aircraft were, in fact, needed. Bombers were modified as a stop-gap, then modifications stopped as offensive aircraft were deemed more important. New transport designs often reached prototype stages, only to be modified to handle offensive capabilities, then those modifications were reversed, then entire projects were canceled. All in all, a lot of stopping and starting with little production seemed to be the result.

    One chapter each is dedicated to transport aircraft of the Army and the Navy. Each one starts with the early years, then proceeds to cover each type of aircraft operated and the units operating them. Color profiles describe each unit code or symbol. Many photos (some color) accompany the text.

    Besides the discussion regarding “standard” transport aircraft, I found the coverage of paratroop and special forces operations to be of particular interest. I don’t think much has been written about this particular branch of the Japanese military prior to this. The same applies to the coverage of glider operations. This part of the book, much like the other chapters, includes many clear photos, color profiles, and some 3-views of the various aircraft. I was interested to read that, as the war progressed, the Japanese experimented with adding engines to their existing glider designs, hoping to create viable transport aircraft. However, this never reached much beyond the experimental stage. This is exactly what the Luftwaffe did with its glider aircraft, but the Germans actually managed to produce these powered gliders (like the Messerschmitt 323 and Gotha 244).

    There is a chapter dedicated to experimental transport aircraft for each branch of service. Each one lists, one by one, each aircraft type that made it to at least the prototype (or at least wind tunnel model) stage. Several of these are proposed modifications of existing aircraft (like the “Emily” flying boat). One type that grabbed my attention in here was the L2D5 – a version of the L2D “Tabby” built entirely of wood (save the nose section and engine nacelles). Two of these airframes were built, and one was discovered by Allied forces at Showa Airbase after the war. The fuselage has a squarish cross section and definitely stands out. Photos taken by Allied personnel at this base clearly show this strange hybrid. In addition to the photos, some nice profiles and line drawings highlight the differences between this and the standard L2Ds. Many other aircraft receive similar treatment.

    The chapter dedicated to “surrender aircraft” is also quite interesting. The author includes text of the message transmitted to the Japanese Government by the Supreme Commander for Allied Powers on August 15th, 1945. This message describes in great detail the type of aircraft that were to provide transport for the Japanese delegation and how exactly these aircraft were to be marked. The entire mission is described, and many photos (including a color one), as well as a color profile, accompany the text. In addition to the coverage of the surrender delegation that flew to surrender to the American forces (with their famous all-white Bettys), there are also several photos of Ki-54s that flew delegations surrendering to the Chinese. Interestingly, these do not carry any of the surrender markings commonly associated with this period of time. Apparently the Chinese did not stipulate any sort of special markings be applied.

    A small chapter after this covers post-war operational use of Japanese transports. There was a pressing need to spread word of the surrender to isolated Japanese outposts and, in many cases, it was more expedient to use existing Japanese aircraft and crews. Japanese transport aircraft and crews were also put to use against guerillas in French Indo-China, often operating in SEAC markings with a British officer or two aboard. Later, these aircraft were handed over to the French.

    Appendices at the end of the book list operational transport aircraft, with a full description, 3-views, and photos of each type. Further appendices have more interesting information, such as a translated service manual for the L2D (from Allied Intelligence).

    I very much enjoyed reading this book, and was very impressed with the author’s coverage of all things relating to Japanese transport aircraft before, during, and immediately after WW2. The text is quite descriptive, photos are plentiful (including many previously unpublished), and there are some nice color profiles and 3-views to boot. I did spot one or two tiny editing errors, but certainly nothing to take away from the overall quality of the book. My only real complaint is that the title may cause many to skip over this book, and that would be a mistake. Anyone interested in Japanese aircraft of the Pacific War should have this one in his or her library.

    Trust me, ALL Japanese transport aircraft of this era are well-covered in this book.

  • Skrzydlata Polska 04/2012 • 2012-04-19
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  • Plastikowe.pl • 2012-04-19

    Opis szczegółowy

    Tematyka

    Tematem książki jest japońskie lotnictwo transportowe. Wbrew pozorom nie tylko maszyny eksperymentalne, ale też sprzęt podstawowy, operacje lotnictwa transportowego, misje specjalne oraz działania powojenne.

    Spis treści

    Foreword

    Preface

    Introduction

    1. Imperial Japanese Army Transport Aircraft — An Overview

    2. Imperial Japanese Navy Transport Aircraft — An Overview

    3. Paratroop and Special Forces Operations

    4. Experimental Transport of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force 1941–1945

    5. Experimental Transport of the Imperial Japanese Naval Air Force

    6. Silent Wings of the Empire

    7. Experimental Transport

    8. Emissaries to the Emperor

    9. The Sun Goes Down

    10. Post-war Japanese Transport Operation

    11. Allied Test Flights of Japanese Transport Aircraft

    12. Surviving Transport Aircraft of Imperial Japan

    13. Japanese Transport Aircraft Photo Album

    Appendix 1

    Appendix 2

    Appendix 3

    Appendix 4

    Appendix 5

    Selected Bibliography

    Jakość edytorska

    Tradycyjna dla Wydawnictwa Stratus — druk wysokiej jakości na świetnym papierze, całość zszywana, co ułatwia lekturę, papier umożliwiający nanoszenie notatek ołówkiem. Całość w twardej lakierowanej okładce, doskonale prezentuje się na półce.

    Plany, zdjęcia i profile

    Planów modelarskich rzecz jasna brak, ale… opublikowano rzuty oraz rysunki przydatne w pracy modelarskiej. Część z nich z pewnością skończy się realizacją w postaci modeli wypuszczanych przez nieduże firmy.

    Kilkaset zdjęć, w tym część w kolorze. Dobrane starannie, wiele z nich jest unikalnych. Każde opisane tak wyczerpująco, jak to możliwe. Dla modelarza to nieocenione źródło informacji o detalach konstrukcji, sposobach malowania, śladach eksploatacji czy wreszcie inspiracja do dioram.

    Podsumowanie

    Absolutnie rewelacyjna publikacja. Porusza tematykę niedocenianą i pomijaną, a przecież lotnictwo transportowe to podstawa prowadzenia konfliktów zbrojnych. Zawiera olbrzymią wręcz ilość informacji, dzięki czemu jest nie tylko albumem z obrazkami, ale i dobrą lekturą. Setki zdjęć stanowią doskonały materiał dokumentacyjny dla modelarzy i już dla nich warto pomyśleć o kupnie książki.

    To publikacja bardzo polecana. Obowiązkowa dla zainteresowanych wojną na Pacyfiku, wskazana również dla osób zainteresowanych operacjami specjalnymi czy testami sprzętu zdobycznego.

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  • MiniReplika Nr 73 • 2012-04-19
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